Self-ish storage

Stashable is a concierge storage service, offering pick-up and delivery of a customer's items to put into secure storage. A division of Iron Mountain, all items were stored in a massive network of secure storage facilities, the same warehouses which guard government documents, master recordings of famous artists, and archived props and staging materials for the entertainment industry.

Before Stashable was a viable product, it began as a mobile app experience called OSOM (Out of Sight, Out of Mind). Iron Mountain approached the industry-leading incubator BCGDV (the digital ventures wing of BCG) to create its first consumer-facing service. While the mobile app was impressive at first glance, it lacked the strategy to onboard new customers fluidly, and was hampered with technological problems and an excessive burn rate that made the product untenable.

After some internal discussions within Iron Mountain, the new team took over and established a new brand titled 'Stashable', and planned a rapid shift in focus and technology.

Early marketing research into different personas and their viability for Stashable.

Our initial order flow

Codenamed 'Falcon', our order flow had to capture important information for our operations team to either pick up or deliver inventory to the customer's address. Knowing whether they were in our service area, whether they had an elevator, whether their building required a certificate of insurance, etc., all had to be known beforehand. Carefully-tested and placed microcopy also had to be utilized to prod the user along, reassuring them that they wouldn't be charged until their stuff was moved into storage.

The original homepage in 2018, released in a 2-month deadline.
Initial illustrations created for Stashable's launch.
Example wireframes, thoroughly-documented.

Journey mapping & discovery

How is my stuff organized?

Does my stuff touch other people's stuff?

What's the minimum stay?

How secure is it?

How often does my rent get raised?

How much does it cost to get my stuff back?

What's the fastest that I can get everything I want delivered?

How is my stuff organized?

Does my stuff touch other people's stuff?

What's the minimum stay?

How secure is it?

How often does my rent get raised?

How much does it cost to get my stuff back?

What's the fastest that I can get everything I want delivered?

How is my stuff organized?

Does my stuff touch other people's stuff?

What's the minimum stay?

How secure is it?

How often does my rent get raised?

How much does it cost to get my stuff back?

What's the fastest that I can get everything I want delivered?

Bringing success in customer support

Moving off of third-party services and previous routines for our customer support and warehouse teams proved to be a difficult task. We wanted familiarity and updates to feel seemless and natural, and so the Product team concepted Alfred, our project for updating an old, antiquated WinForms software into a new, React/Redux-based system for tracking inventory, orders, and scheduling.

An example of a sitemap and user flow for Alfred.
A tech flow for Orders and integration with software.
MVP UI for v1.0 of Alfred using our newborn component system, Sprinter.

A mobile experience for thorough processing

To ensure our associates were able to document every move and shift of inventory in the warehouse or truck, the Product team relied on Belvedere, an internal React Native mobile app. The app itself was meant to replace a Windows Mobile CE application, and used specific Android devices with scanning capabilities to ensure speedy gatekeeping of inventory in every step, as well as re-naming, measuring, and finding inventory.

Our uniform for drivers, manufacturered with reflective piping for safety.
Example pages of v1.0 and v1.1 of Belvedere, our internal React Native mobile app.

A better version of ourselves

With a new team on board, Stashable ditched the native mobile app, citing excessive cost and maintenance, marketing difficulties, and an audience's reluctance to put yet another app on their phone. Without the hindrance of OSOM, we moved forward with a React/Redux web application, making it much easier to bring users into the ecosystem with paid search and social media marketing strategies. With a trove of information pulled from Iron Mountain and BCGDV's initial efforts, we targeted a thrifty and fast 2-month deadline to launch a new brand and order flow. On March 1st, 2018, we launched successfully and began seeing a flood of orders come in. As we grew over time, we regularly tracked analytics via Google Analytics, Heap, FullStory, and a number of other tools to gauge improvements, and regularly composed user interviews to grow our audience efficiently.

The homepage for 2019, after establishing re-brand.
One of our unofficial mascots, Phil, in a 3D-rendered crate.
An ad constructed from stock imagery, collaged by Anthony Foster.
An ad constructed from stock imagery, collaged by Anthony Foster.

Team members

Anuj Jhunjhunwala
Product Manager

Theresa Zhu
Experience Designer

Diana Yee
Experience Designer

Sarah Klamans
Experience Designer

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